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May 16 Wikipedia featured article

Apatosaurus ("deceptive lizard") is a genus of extinct sauropod dinosaurs that lived in North America during the Late Jurassic period. Fossils from the Morrison Formation of Colorado, Oklahoma, and Utah indicate an average length of 21–22.8 m (69–75 ft) and an average mass of 16.4–22.4 t (18.1–24.7 short tons), but a few specimens are up to 30% longer and weigh two to three times as much. The cervical vertebrae are less elongated and more heavily constructed than those of Diplodocus, and the bones of the leg are much stockier despite being longer, implying that Apatosaurus was a more robust animal. The tail was held above the ground during normal locomotion. It had a single claw on each forelimb and three on each hindlimb. The skull is similar to that of Diplodocus. It browsed foliage and likely held its head elevated. Air sacs permeated and lightened its vertebrae. In North America during the late Jurassic, Apatosaurus lived alongside dinosaurs such as Diplodocus, Allosaurus, Camarasaurus, and Stegosaurus. (Full article...) Recently featured: The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction John Gielgud Manuel Marques de Sousa, Count of Porto Alegre Archive By email More featured articles...

May 17 Wikipedia featured article

Edward III (1312–1377), King of England from 1327 until his death, restored royal authority after the unorthodox and disastrous reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His reign of fifty years, the second longest in medieval England, saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign. After a successful campaign in Scotland he declared himself the rightful heir to the French throne in 1337, but his claim was denied, starting the Hundred Years' War. Following some initial setbacks the war went well for England; victories at Crécy and Poitiers led to the favourable Treaty of Brétigny. Edward's later years were marked by international failure and domestic strife, largely as a result of his inactivity and poor health. (Full article...) Recently featured: Apatosaurus The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction John Gielgud Archive By email More featured articles...

May 18 Wikipedia featured article

William Henry Bury (1859–1889) was suspected of being the notorious serial killer Jack the Ripper. Hanged for the murder of his wife Ellen, he was the last person executed in Dundee, Scotland. Orphaned at an early age, he was dismissed from his job for theft, and became a street peddler. In February 1889, one month after moving from London to Dundee with his wife, he strangled her with a rope, stabbed her dead body with a penknife, and hid the corpse in a box in their room. A few days later, he presented himself to the local police and was arrested for her murder. This was shortly after the height of the London Whitechapel murders, which were attributed to the unidentified serial killer Jack the Ripper. Bury's previous abode near Whitechapel and the similarities between the Ripper's crimes and Bury's led the press and executioner James Berry to suggest that Bury was the Ripper. He protested his innocence, and the police discounted him as a suspect. Later authors have built on the earlier accusations, but the idea that Bury was the Ripper is not widely accepted. (Full article...) Recently featured: Edward III of England Apatosaurus The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Archive By email More featured articles...

May 19 Wikipedia featured article

A Brill Tramway train Wood Siding railway station was a halt in Bernwood Forest, Buckinghamshire, England, opened in 1871 as a terminus of a horse-drawn tramway serving the Duke of Buckingham's estates and connecting them to the railway at Quainton Road. After a campaign by residents of Brill, the tramway was adapted for passengers and extended beyond Wood Siding in 1872, becoming known as the Brill Tramway. The operation of the line was taken over by the Metropolitan Railway in 1899. Between 1908 and 1910 Wood Siding was rebuilt on a bridge over the Chiltern Main Line. In 1933 the Metropolitan Railway was taken into public ownership, becoming the Metropolitan line of London Transport. As a result, Wood Siding became part of the London Underground network, despite being over 45 miles (72 km) from the City of London. London Transport aimed to move away from freight services, and as the line served a sparsely populated rural area the new management felt it would never be a viable passenger route. The station was closed, along with the rest of the line, in November 1935, and demolished in 1936. The remains of the bridge which supported it are still in place. (Full article...) Recently featured: William Henry Bury Edward III of England Apatosaurus Archive By email More featured articles...

May 20 Wikipedia featured article

Ray Charles "Here We Go Again" is a country music standard written by Don Lanier and Red Steagall that first charted as a rhythm and blues single by Ray Charles (pictured) from the 1967 album Ray Charles Invites You to Listen. It was produced by Joe Adams for ABC Records/Tangerine Records, and spent twelve consecutive weeks on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at number 15. A cover version by Nancy Sinatra charted for five weeks in 1969. Johnny Duncan charted with the song on Billboard's Hot Country Songs for five weeks in 1972, while Roy Clark did so for seven weeks in 1982. Another version sung by Norah Jones and Charles appeared on his 2004 album Genius Loves Company, earning the Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration at the 47th Grammy Awards (posthumously for Charles, who died in 2004). The song lent its name to Steagall's 2007 album, and has been covered in a wide variety of musical genres. Many of the more recent covers have been sung as duets, including one by Jones and Willie Nelson (with Wynton Marsalis accompanying) released on their 2011 tribute album Here We Go Again: Celebrating the Genius of Ray Charles. (Full article...) Recently featured: Wood Siding railway station William Henry Bury Edward III of England Archive By email More featured articles...

May 21 Wikipedia featured article

Brabham BT18-Honda Brabham was a British racing car manufacturer and Formula One racing team. Founded in 1960 by two Australians, driver Jack Brabham and designer Ron Tauranac, the team won four Drivers' and two Constructors' World Championships in its 30-year Formula One history. Jack Brabham's 1966 Drivers' Championship remains the only such achievement using a car bearing the driver's own name. In the 1960s, Brabham was the world's largest manufacturer of open-wheel racing cars for sale to customer teams, building more than 500 cars by 1970. During this period, teams using Brabham cars won championships in Formula Two and Formula Three. Brabham cars also competed in the Indianapolis 500 and in Formula 5000 racing. The team won two more Formula One Drivers' Championships in the 1980s with Brazilian Nelson Piquet. Bernie Ecclestone owned Brabham during most of the 1970s and 1980s. Its last owner was the Middlebridge Group, a Japanese engineering firm. Midway through the 1992 season, the team collapsed financially, and was investigated by the Serious Fraud Office. (Full article...) Recently featured: "Here We Go Again" (Ray Charles song) Wood Siding railway station William Henry Bury Archive By email More featured articles...